Haskell

Haskell - Sudoku Solver - List Monad

Haskell Sudoku Solver - List Monad In this article we will write a Sudoku solver in Haskell using the expressive and powerful List Monad to enumerate the solutions trasparently. I assume that the reader has a general understanding of monads (if not read http://www.idryman.org/blog/2014/01/23/yet-another-monad-tutorial/) Su Doku means literally  number place is the name of a popular puzzle game that a special case of the old Latin Square (invented by Leonard Euler). Latin Square force each symbol to appear once in each row and column. In addition to these contraint Sudoku force each symbol to apper one in each sub-matrix. In the general case Sudoku is… Read More »Haskell - Sudoku Solver - List Monad

Haskell Seminar @ UNICAL

Haskell Seminar at University of Calabria During the last year I got much interest in functional programming and in particular in Haskell. Very few people write and study Haskell at University of Calabria (one of them is the manteiner of gnome for NixOs) and so I decided to do a introductive lesson (a big thanks go to the guys of the ciotoflow). It was a great experience, and people were enthusiast and curious. All the material i produced is available for download and use, and hopefully will be gradually updated and improved. All the files are available on github. Introductive slides here

Fold operator - a brief detour

This article aims to be a brief practical introduction to new haskell programmer about the fold high order function (which roughly speaking is a function that takes as input and/or produces as output a function) and its usage. It will also outline a bit of the theory that lies behind this operator (the term operator comes from the field of recursion theory (Kleene, 1952), even if, striclty speaking fold is a function in haskell).

Haskell Fold - Introduction and formal definition

Many problem in function programming are solved by means of tail recursive functions (one that do not perform any other operations that need some values from the recursive call). For instance let's say we want to get the product of integers stored in a list.
What we would do is to write down a tail recursive function (more or less) like this

tailmultiply :: [Int] -> Int -> Int
tailmultiply [] acc     = acc
tailmultiply (x:xs) acc = tailmultiply xs (acc * x)

Note, to stress the tail recursion, a definition like the one that follows would not be tail recursive.

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